Welcome to Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 2,500 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


Statin Intolerance

Statin Intolerance Research Study


For more information call:
(904) 621-0390
email: lmoore@encoredocs.com 

 

 

Insomnia

Insomnia Research Study


 
For more information call:
(904) 621-0390
email: lmoore@encoredocs.com 





View all active studies

Our Volunteers Love Us


Watch what they have to say about their research experience!



Postpartum Depression Research Testimonial
Phase 1 Research Joe's Experience
Phase I Research Terry's Experience

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Our Staff

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Dr. Mitchell Rothstein

Dr. Mitchell Rothstein is a Clinical Research Investigator at our Fleming Island research site and he has been with us for 5 years now. In February 2017, we are happy to say that Dr. Rothstein also became our new Phase 1 Medical Director at our Jacksonville University research site. We consider him an all-star at ENCORE Research Group, not only did he perform the first endobronchial stent in Jacksonville, but he also lettered in gymnastics in college. Which is probably why he handles working at two locations with ease.

In his free time, he collects animation art, especially the work of Chuck Jones, the famous Looney Tunes animator. Dr. Rothstein is a major sports fan. He loves watching mixed martial arts and is an Olympics sports addict. He is also a fan of the Jacksonville Jaguars, the New York Mets and the Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp, our minor-league baseball team in Jacksonville.

While Dr. Rothstein has some downtime, he enjoys eating, he calls himself a ‘happy carnivore’! Some of his favorite TV shows to watch are: Fargo, Billions, Jeopardy, and Snapped. All in all, we’re glad we have Dr. Rothstein as part of our ENCORE Research team and we’re excited to see what he accomplishes with us in the years to come. 

William Davila, MD

Dr. William Davila is the Medical Director and Principal Investigator at ENCORE Research Group’s Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research.

Dr. Davila received his Doctor of Medicine degree from Ponce School of Medicine, Puerto Rico after completing his undergraduate degree from the University of Puerto Rico. Serving in the United States Navy until 2008, he completed his internship at William Beaumont Army Medical Center in El Paso, Texas and his residency at the Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Virginia.

Dr. Davila is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and is licensed by the state of Florida. He has been a primary care physician at Gatien and Associates since 2008. He is fluent in English and Spanish.

Fun Facts about Dr. Davila:

Hobbies:               RC Cars

Favorite Food:    Pizza

Favorite Sport:   Basketball

Favorite Movie: Gladiator

Lisa Moore

Do you know Lisa Moore at Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research?  She has been a member of our research family for fourteen years, and surprisingly in addition to being an accomplished research coordinator, she is a home project expert.  She can often be seen gardening and renovating her old house! 

Lisa is the mother of two children and a French bulldog mix. She enjoys health and fitness, and is currently a CrossFit devotee who also likes to compete in 5k runs.  This allows her to burn off her favorite foods which include cheese fondue with veggies and Renna’s pizza.

During those rare, quieter moments, you might find her at home baking, crafting or crocheting with her dog Sparkles by her side. 

Lastest Blog Post:


Why Are English Sailors Called Limeys?

On a sailing ship in 1747, twelve sailors who had begun the voyage feeling fine were overcome with fatigue.  Their gums were swollen and sore, making it difficult to eat.  Their teeth were falling out.  Their legs were swollen and purple from bruising.  

Dr. James Lind was a passenger on that ship, and he set out to find the cause.  He set up what may have been the first clinical nutrition experiment.  He decided on six groups of treatments, 2 sailors in each group: 

1. drank one quart of cider a day
2. gargled with sulfuric acid
3. had two spoonfuls of vinegar, 3 times a day
4. drank ½ pint seawater a day
5. drank barley water
6. ate two oranges and 1 lemon a day

Within six days, the sailors who ate the oranges and lemon felt better, and were able to work again.  The other sailors in the experiment felt worse.  The ill sailors were suffering from a lack of vitamin C, now known as Scurvy. They had plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables when they first set out on the voyage.  But fresh foods ran out on the long voyage, and they suffered symptoms from this lack. After this finding, sailors often brought lime juice aboard ship because it could be stored longer. This is how sailors earned the nickname “limey”.

1747 was well before the requirement of informed consent of the patient, detailed eligibility criteria, protocols and regulations, which are a foundation of today’s clinical research.  Nevertheless, it is an interesting example of a method of discovering the best treatment for a disabling condition.  

Scientific minds are still seeking solutions for medical problems.  Modern clinical research is strictly regulated for the safety and well-being of the research volunteer.  Great progress has been made in medical science over the last decades.  This progress could not happen without dedicated volunteers. Participation in clinical trials can be a rewarding endeavor for both investigators and volunteers alike.

Written by Julia Baker, RN, CCRC

Resources:  
https://askabiologist.asu.edu
https://www.umass.edu/nibble/infofile/limey.html
 
 

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