Welcome to Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 2,500 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


Statin Intolerance

Statin Intolerance Research Study


 

For more information call:
(904) 621-0390
email: cbuda@encoredocs.com 

 

C. Diff Vaccine

C. Diff Prevention Vaccine Research Study



For more information call:
(904) 621-0390
email: cbuda@encoredocs.com 





View all active studies

Our Volunteers Love Us


Watch what they have to say about their research experience!



Postpartum Depression Research Testimonial
Phase 1 Research Joe's Experience
Phase I Research Terry's Experience

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Our Staff

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Dr. Mitchell Rothstein

Dr. Mitchell Rothstein is a Clinical Research Investigator at our Fleming Island research site and he has been with us for 5 years now. In February 2017, we are happy to say that Dr. Rothstein also became our new Phase 1 Medical Director at our Jacksonville University research site. We consider him an all-star at ENCORE Research Group, not only did he perform the first endobronchial stent in Jacksonville, but he also lettered in gymnastics in college. Which is probably why he handles working at two locations with ease.

In his free time, he collects animation art, especially the work of Chuck Jones, the famous Looney Tunes animator. Dr. Rothstein is a major sports fan. He loves watching mixed martial arts and is an Olympics sports addict. He is also a fan of the Jacksonville Jaguars, the New York Mets and the Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp, our minor-league baseball team in Jacksonville.

While Dr. Rothstein has some downtime, he enjoys eating, he calls himself a ‘happy carnivore’! Some of his favorite TV shows to watch are: Fargo, Billions, Jeopardy, and Snapped. All in all, we’re glad we have Dr. Rothstein as part of our ENCORE Research team and we’re excited to see what he accomplishes with us in the years to come. 

William Davila, MD

Dr. William Davila is the Medical Director and Principal Investigator at ENCORE Research Group’s Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research.

Dr. Davila received his Doctor of Medicine degree from Ponce School of Medicine, Puerto Rico after completing his undergraduate degree from the University of Puerto Rico. Serving in the United States Navy until 2008, he completed his internship at William Beaumont Army Medical Center in El Paso, Texas and his residency at the Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Virginia.

Dr. Davila is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and is licensed by the state of Florida. He has been a primary care physician at Gatien and Associates since 2008. He is fluent in English and Spanish.

Fun Facts about Dr. Davila:

Hobbies:               RC Cars

Favorite Food:    Pizza

Favorite Sport:   Basketball

Favorite Movie: Gladiator

Karen Schuran

“I LOVE to shop!  I would shop all the time if I could!” says Karen Schuran, who earns her shopping money by being the Research Assistant and Lab Processor at Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research. Karen has been a member of our research family for 10 years and continues to be a valuable asset to the company.
She and her husband are celebrating their 25th Anniversary of marriage this month. They have two children, a daughter and a son. Karen is also “Grandma” to a cute, fuzzy bunny named Snoopy.
Karen’s favorite sport is football, which she has been learning more about so she can keep up with the men in the house. She also likes to watch game shows like Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy, but Karen admits her real guilty pleasure is horror movies. “I absolutely LOVE horror movies, the scarier the better!”

Lastest Blog Post:


5.7 Million Adults in the US Have Heart Failure

The heart is vital (literally), so it’s important to keep it in tip-top shape! The rest of the body depends on the heart to deliver blood and oxygen to all its cells and organs. If the heart becomes damaged, it can lead to what is known as heart failure. Keeping your heart healthy not only involves proper diet and exercise, but also involves making sure conditions that can cause heart damage are properly managed.

Some conditions that can damage the heart are: 
• cardiomyopathy
• coronary artery disease
• diabetes
• heart attacks
• high blood pressure

During heart failure the heart is unable to pump blood effectively enough to meet the body’s demands. Because the heart cannot fulfill its primary duty, it will try to compensate by enlarging itself, increasing muscle mass or pumping faster. The body can also react by narrowing blood vessels and diverting blood away from less important tissues and organs. As heart failure worsens the compensations and symptoms begin to show.

Common symptoms of heart failure include: shortness of breath, fatigue, coughing, racing heart, excessive tiredness, loss of appetite, and chest pain. Risk factors for developing heart failure include diabetes, poorly controlled high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or family history of heart failure. If you think you might have symptoms of heart failure, it’s important to speak with your doctor as soon as possible.

There are about 5.7 million adults in the United States who have heart failure and it’s the leading cause of death in diabetics. In most cases, heart failure cannot be reversed once diagnosed. However, researchers are continuing to study ways to reverse heart failure as well as new and better ways to treat it. Currently, many of our ENCORE research sites have new heart failure research studies enrolling. If you or someone you know has heart failure, and are interested in participating, call our office to find out more!
 

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