Welcome to Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 2,500 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


Heart Disease & Overweight

Heart Disease Research

Have Heart Disease & Are Overweight? You may qualify for one of our research studies! 
Qualified volunteers may receive at no cost:
  • investigational medication
  • study-related care from a local doctor
  • possible compensation
Health insurance isn’t required to participate.

For more information call
Or sign up below!
(904) 621-0390
Email: lmoore@encoredocs.com

Hot Flashes

Hot Flashes Research


Have Hot Flashes? You may qualify for one of our research studies! 
Qualified volunteers may receive at no cost:
  • investigational medication
  • study-related care from a local doctor
  • possible compensation
Health insurance isn’t required to participate.

For more information call
Or sign up below!
(904) 621-0390
Email: lmoore@encoredocs.com





View all active studies

Our Volunteers Love Us


Watch what they have to say about their research experience!



Postpartum Depression Research Testimonial
Phase 1 Research Joe's Experience
Phase I Research Terry's Experience

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Our Staff

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Dr. Mitchell Rothstein

Dr. Mitchell Rothstein is a Clinical Research Investigator at our Fleming Island research site and he has been with us for 5 years now. In February 2017, we are happy to say that Dr. Rothstein also became our new Phase 1 Medical Director at our Jacksonville University research site. We consider him an all-star at ENCORE Research Group, not only did he perform the first endobronchial stent in Jacksonville, but he also lettered in gymnastics in college. Which is probably why he handles working at two locations with ease.

In his free time, he collects animation art, especially the work of Chuck Jones, the famous Looney Tunes animator. Dr. Rothstein is a major sports fan. He loves watching mixed martial arts and is an Olympics sports addict. He is also a fan of the Jacksonville Jaguars, the New York Mets and the Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp, our minor-league baseball team in Jacksonville.

While Dr. Rothstein has some downtime, he enjoys eating, he calls himself a ‘happy carnivore’! Some of his favorite TV shows to watch are: Fargo, Billions, Jeopardy, and Snapped. All in all, we’re glad we have Dr. Rothstein as part of our ENCORE Research team and we’re excited to see what he accomplishes with us in the years to come. 

William Davila, MD

Dr. William Davila is the Medical Director and Principal Investigator at ENCORE Research Group’s Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research.

Dr. Davila received his Doctor of Medicine degree from Ponce School of Medicine, Puerto Rico after completing his undergraduate degree from the University of Puerto Rico. Serving in the United States Navy until 2008, he completed his internship at William Beaumont Army Medical Center in El Paso, Texas and his residency at the Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Virginia.

Dr. Davila is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and is licensed by the state of Florida. He has been a primary care physician at Gatien and Associates since 2008. He is fluent in English and Spanish.

Fun Facts about Dr. Davila:

Hobbies:               RC Cars

Favorite Food:    Pizza

Favorite Sport:   Basketball

Favorite Movie: Gladiator

Lisa Moore

Do you know Lisa Moore at Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research?  She has been a member of our research family for fourteen years, and surprisingly in addition to being an accomplished research coordinator, she is a home project expert.  She can often be seen gardening and renovating her old house! 

Lisa is the mother of two children and a French bulldog mix. She enjoys health and fitness, and is currently a CrossFit devotee who also likes to compete in 5k runs.  This allows her to burn off her favorite foods which include cheese fondue with veggies and Renna’s pizza.

During those rare, quieter moments, you might find her at home baking, crafting or crocheting with her dog Sparkles by her side. 

Lastest Blog Post:


What Are Triglycerides?

What Are Triglycerides?

Triglycerides are a type of fat (lipid) found in your blood.  You get them in two ways – from the food you eat and from what your liver makes.  Eating too many calories, especially from high carbohydrate foods, could lead to high triglycerides (hypertriglyceridemia), as could certain medications.  High triglycerides could also be a sign of diabetes or thyroid problems, or be genetic.

Almost 1 in 3 Americans have high triglycerides.  When you have excess triglycerides, they are stored in the fat cells for later use.  When they are needed, your body releases them as fatty acids, which fuel body movement, create heat, and provide energy for the body processes.

A fasting blood test can tell where your triglyceride level falls.  For good health, your triglyceride level should be less than 150 mg/dL.  Borderline high levels are 150-199 mg/dL.  High is 200-499 mg/dL.   Very high is more than 500 mg/dL

Diet and Lifestyle Changes to reduce High Triglycerides
Consume less sugar and refined carbohydrates – limit white breads, white rice, white potatoes, sweetened beverages, sugary cereals, cakes and cookies.  Instead choose whole grain breads, quinoa or wild rice, and fresh fruits and vegetables. Aim for 30 grams of fiber a day.

Choose Healthy fats – use unsaturated fats such as olive and avocado oils.  Eat fish, poultry, less red meat, and enjoy some meatless meals. 

Limit your intake of alcohol – for some people drinking even a little bit can have a big effect on triglycerides. 

One of the best ways to lower triglycerides is with regular exercise.  Aim for an average of 40 minutes of moderate to high intensity exercise on 3 to 4 days a week.  Taking a brisk walk every day works for many people.

When Healthy Lifestyle Changes Are Not Enough
Your doctor may recommend medication to help lower your high triglycerides, such as nicotinic acid (niacin), fibrates, omega-3-fatty acids (fish oil) or statins.  There are also some new medications being developed that may not only lower your triglycerides, but reduce your risk of heart disease overall.  Many of our research sites are participating in these important clinical trials.  We invite you to contact one of our sites near you to see if you could benefit from one of these programs.

Lori Alexander, MSHS, RDN, CCRC, CLS, FNLA
Director, ENCORE Lipid Center of Excellence


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